Adam Vasquez

What Parking Says About Your Character


There is a direct correlation between a person being a great colleague and how he or she parks their car. In fact, it’s become part of my interview process. You can learn a lot about a person’s character just by observing this simple, everyday maneuver. Here are a few of the characteristics that have been revealed to me through this exercise.

Work Ethic

Do you care enough to park in between the lines? Even the most experienced drivers can miss the angle the first time. Are you determined enough to try again or give up? How will you handle a complex project if you can’t handle parking a Honda Civic?

Attention to Detail

Do you take your time to get it right? If you’re not considering the fact that you didn’t leave enough space for the car next to you, how do I know you’ll care enough to use “affect” vs “effect” in an email to a client?

Teamwork

If you took two parking spaces, it’s pretty clear you don’t care much about others. What if a colleague needs help or a late-night deadline is looming? When the team wins, will you share the credit or will you step on others?

Strategic Thinking

When you park poorly, the risk of damage, inconvenience, even a pinched finger, all go up. If you can’t be forward thinking enough to play out basic scenarios, then you won’t be able to strategize the outcome of a brand experience.

If you back into your parking space, you get extra kudos, since you are preparing for future success!

Next time you park your car, be sure to do it right. Even little habits like these can translate into long-term success. And if you have a colleague that consistently parks poorly, I suspect they are not a high performer, and if they are, they may just be a certified A$$hole.

If you pass the parking test, Merit is looking for talented individuals who care about others and the little details that amount to success.

About Adam Vasquez

Adam is the President and CEO of Merit, the global leader in market invention. He is known for his ability to create markets for clients. His efforts have not only achieved many accolades, but have also served as an engine for sustained growth, profitability, and mission success for a number of small, medium and large companies.

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